robertozod:

Spiral galaxy M 106


#galaxy #NASA #astronomy #space

robertozod:

Spiral galaxy M 106

astronemma:

Comparison views of “Mystic Mountain”

These two images of a pillar of star birth, three light-years high, demonstrate how observations taken in visible and infrared light by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope reveal dramatically different and complementary views of an object. This turbulent cosmic pinnacle lies within a tempestuous stellar nursery called the Carina Nebula, located 7500 light-years away in the southern constellation of Carina.

Credit: NASA, ESA, M. Livio and the Hubble 20th Anniversary Team (STScI), via spacetelescope.org

cosmiblog:

A star cluster by the name NGC 3603
Source:hubblesite.org 

#star #NGC3603 #space

cosmiblog:

A star cluster by the name NGC 3603

Source:
hubblesite.org 

#star #NGC3603 #space

lovede3p:

Image: ESA/Hubble & NASA. Acknowledgement: Claude Cornen
Man, we all know space is beautiful, but this photo from our old pal Hubble is melting my mind right now. That red orb of gas is what’s left of a progenitor start that went full on supernova around 600 years ago, according to NASA. Look at it within the bed of stars near and far: Within all the tiny dots, which are all incredibly massive balls of fire, there’s a glowing sphere expanding outward as the spectacular reminder of what happens when galactic chemistry goes apeshit.
According to the folks at NASA, the object is known as SNR B0519-69.0, or SNR 0519 if you’re on friendly terms. It’s located more than 150,000 light years away “in the southern constellation of Dorado (The Dolphinfish), a constellation that also contains most of our neighboring galaxy the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC).”
Curiously, the start SNR 0519 is born of is known to be a white dwarf that was similar to our own Sun. So, while I’m not going to say that it’s a mirror image of a cosmic selfie we Earthlings may take in a few billion years when our own Sun possibly explodes, it is pretty interesting to think that, even with our miniscule presence in the universe, our solar system may one day make its mark. Of course, we’ll all be blown up/dead already, but hey, at least it’d look cool.
@derektmead
By Derek Mead 6 months ago
http://motherboard.vice.com/blog/this-hubble-photo-of-a-supernova-remnant-will-detonate-your-brain

#space #Hubble #supernova #star

lovede3p:

Image: ESA/Hubble & NASA. Acknowledgement: Claude Cornen

Man, we all know space is beautiful, but this photo from our old pal Hubble is melting my mind right now. That red orb of gas is what’s left of a progenitor start that went full on supernova around 600 years ago, according to NASA. Look at it within the bed of stars near and far: Within all the tiny dots, which are all incredibly massive balls of fire, there’s a glowing sphere expanding outward as the spectacular reminder of what happens when galactic chemistry goes apeshit.

According to the folks at NASA, the object is known as SNR B0519-69.0, or SNR 0519 if you’re on friendly terms. It’s located more than 150,000 light years away “in the southern constellation of Dorado (The Dolphinfish), a constellation that also contains most of our neighboring galaxy the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC).”

Curiously, the start SNR 0519 is born of is known to be a white dwarf that was similar to our own Sun. So, while I’m not going to say that it’s a mirror image of a cosmic selfie we Earthlings may take in a few billion years when our own Sun possibly explodes, it is pretty interesting to think that, even with our miniscule presence in the universe, our solar system may one day make its mark. Of course, we’ll all be blown up/dead already, but hey, at least it’d look cool.

@derektmead

By Derek Mead 6 months ago

http://motherboard.vice.com/blog/this-hubble-photo-of-a-supernova-remnant-will-detonate-your-brain

#space #Hubble #supernova #star

phosejina:

Pictures taken from:-HUBBLE SITE: http://hubblesite.org/gallery/album/

    #Hubble

lawsoffate:

Interacting Galaxies Arp 142 (by Hubble Heritage)

lawsoffate:

Interacting Galaxies Arp 142 (by Hubble Heritage)

the-lone-pamphleteer:

Mystic Mountain, released for Hubble’s 20th anniversary, reveals a landscape never before studied in such detail. These pillars show the telltale signature of new stars forming at their tips and strong jets of material being ejected into the interstellar medium for great distances. Many such features are seen in the Carina Nebula, a vast area of dust and gas in our Milky Way Galaxy. This is the most obvious and spectacular example, similar to others in an immense Hubble mosaic made a few years before. Learn more

#space #cosmos #universe #nebula #astronomy

the-lone-pamphleteer:

Mystic Mountain, released for Hubble’s 20th anniversary, reveals a landscape never before studied in such detail. These pillars show the telltale signature of new stars forming at their tips and strong jets of material being ejected into the interstellar medium for great distances. Many such features are seen in the Carina Nebula, a vast area of dust and gas in our Milky Way Galaxy. This is the most obvious and spectacular example, similar to others in an immense Hubble mosaic made a few years before. Learn more